Old Foston Church Doors

While in Leicestershire a few weeks ago, we were taken to have a little peek at this interesting little church, known locally as The Old Foston Church.

St Bartholomew’s Church dates back to the 10th Century and would have been the centre of life in the village (of about 20 -30 families) for a few hundred years.

But the village was deserted in the 1600’s as a result of the enclosure of common lands, leaving only the squire, a rector and maybe three labouring families. I presume it was used by the squire and his family from then on. We didn’t see evidence of the village at all.

But the little church remains active, in its charming setting on the edge of the woods. Unfortunately, the doors were locked as it was mid-week and it is secluded and it’s 2019. (Sign of the times). Too, bad. I’d have loved to see inside.

Plans were underway for the annual Flower Show, scheduled for … oh! This weekend! Wouldn’t that be fun to see? Tents and booths set up around the church and flowers (and people!) everywhere!

Westminster Doors

There is something so enticing, so charming about a mews.

While in London recently, and enroute to the Victoria & Albert Museum, we stumbled upon this beauty.

What an amazing collection of inviting doorways!

All on one small street! Okay … not a street. A Mews.

The spring flowers helped, too!

Tower Doors

We tried to be early enough in the day to beat the crowds. And we almost managed it.

Today we made our way around the Tower of London. And for you … some doors pics!!

From the chapel.

A glance out the window….

And a peak into a very old loo …

And, of course, a greeting from one of the ravens:

Thanks for dropping by!!

Linked with Norm’s Thursday Doors

Cosby Doors

Here we are. Back in Leicestershire in the UK to visit with hubby’s ailing father. We can only manage one visit per year and so see a marked decline in our aging relatives. It’s difficult, but as the customs agent reminded me (while comparing my passport photo with my real time face) “age is a privilege relief to many”. (!!!) wow.

May is a truly lovely time to visit England, tho. We took a wander round the ancient village of Cosby last evening.

Cosby is mentioned in the Doomsday Book in 1086, so for sure dates back that far. There suggestions that it goes back even to Roman times because a Roman road (the Fosse Way) boarders the village.

The parish church was built in the 13th century.

And a very pretty brook runs through the village – home to some happy ducks.

The roadside of the Cosby House barn is bit wobbly.

And there are heaps of pretty doors.

Thanks for dropping by. And hope you enjoyed the tour.

Linked with Norm’s Thursday Doors

Cold, Cold Saint John Doors

When most folks in my corner of the world consider a winter get away they usually picture someplace warm, perhaps a tropical drink in hand and toes in the sand. Or … hardier travellers might head for the ski hills. I tend toward city visits.

But in this particular trip, I’d have to say, I didn’t time it very well.

I haven’t been to Saint John, New Brunswick for years, so I was looking forward to a little exploring.

A VERY little exploring, it turned out.

The combination of bitter cold temperatures and brisk windchills (ie -30C) with ice covered sidewalks conspired against me.

I managed a quick jaunt along Germaine Street and wasn’t disappointed with the architecture.

Luckily, the city makes a visit a little easier in winter with pedways and tunnels connecting some of the must see spots…

… Such as the very charming City Market.

That said, I feel a return visit during one of the warmer months is warranted – for sure.

For now, I’m in full agreement with Norm Frampton – enough with winter!

Countesthorpe Doors

Treasures in small-ish places.

This summer we made our way across the pond to the village of Countesthorpe (pop 6,300 +\-), Leicestershire in England to visit my in-laws. Thats smack in the middle of the Midlands.

My husbands folks have always come to us. For years and years. But now, age and health concerns have gotten in the way. So, it’s our turn to return the favour.

And lucky us!! We get to explore!

Open door policy at the Bulls Head.

As you can see, it was bright and sunny – every single day. And HOT! Unexpectedly hot.

Nice job, Countesthorpe! You sure offer up a nice variety is welcoming doorways!!

Linked to Norm’s Thursday Doors.

Doors of Kings Landing

Back in the ’70’s, plans for a dam on the beautiful St John River in New Brunswick threatened a group of 18th Century buildings. Some bright spark had the idea to move them out of harms way. The result is s vibrant, living historical village.

We visited on a very hot holiday Monday and all the doors were thrown open to welcome a bit of breeze as well as us visitors.

The delightful staff not only welcomed us into their homes and places of business, they drew us in the 18th village with the play acting. We were encouraged to lend a hand to help with the chores. Because it takes a village to … well … make village.

Linked to Norm’s Thursday Doors

Brooklyn Heights Doors

Last week we were in Manhattan and decided to take a little walk.

We made our way from the east side of 40th Street south to the Brooklyn Bridge.

Soooooo, of course we had to walk across to Brooklyn.

After checking out the Promenade, we wandered through the streets of Brooklyn Heights.

Those stately brownstones have some pretty serious door-bragging-rights!

I couldn’t resist stopping to grab a few shots on my phone… to share with you.

After stopping for a delicious pizza & salad, we made our way to Dumbo for a quick explore before heading back across the Bridge and to our hotel.

It was a long, hot walk. Something like 23 kilometres in New York’s August heat.

And still, it was an exhilarating adventure! One of those bucket list kind of days.

Linked to Norm’s Thursday Doors

Tu Hwnt I’r Bont Tearoom

We are currently touring, and falling head-over-heels in love with the beautiful and magical country of Wales.

Stopped by here for a pot of tea. After we found the door …

THERE it is!!!

A lovely cuppa!

Take note of the brass plaque on the wall by the door. It indicates the high water mark of the flood waters from the adjacent river.

This is one resilient building. Charming and strong. Just like Wales.