Vibrant

image

Last June I volunteered to guide a group of grades primary-3 students (ages 5-9) in a collaborative art project.  Here each student created a 3-D butterfly in colours which spoke to them.  When brought together like this, the piece reflects their joy of learning and their part within their community. The piece continues to be displayed outside of the school office, and what fun it is to see the children continue to stop by and seek out their own part – their individual butterfly.   I love how this collaborative piece comes together to be greater than the sum of its parts.

image

Considering art, collections and vibrancy ….. I can’t help but think of the fabulous realist Mary Pratt.  Her vibrant reflection of daily life is uplifting and …..humbling.. This was part of a retrospective presented at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. If you’d like to see more about that show, you can do that here.

WPC – vibrant

Something

“My only strength is finding something where most people find nothing” (Mary Pratt)

IMG_1994.JPG</
I made a bit of a pilgrimage through the weather on a rainy, windy November morning to the take in Mary Pratt's, one of Canada's most beloved realist painter, 50-Year Retrospective at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia.

It is her tremendous ability to ennoble the everyday, to elevate it to the near sacred that sets her apart. As a wife and mother of four living in rural Newfoundland, Pratt's finds beauty and difficulty in the everyday; from breakfast time ("Eggs in an Egg Crate", 1975) to Sunday dinner ("Basting the Turkey", 2003), to bathing a baby ("Child with Two Adults", 1983), her imagery is a powerful reminder of the rich and complex feelings that hover around what might be considered mundane.

But, wow! It is "Jelly Shelf", 1999 that makes us stop and inhale sharply. It is extraordinary.

IMG_1996.PNG
Something where most people find nothing, indeed.

It is fabulous show! In the company of these rich, lively images, I quickly forgot the rain, dripping from my umbrella.

Swarm

This hauntingly beautiful piece is part of the Northern Exposure group exhibit at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. Tania Kitchell’s installation “Occupy” is made up of a series of sculptures that represent invasive plant species in the arctic. They are made of ABS plastic on a 3-D printer.

I really wasn’t expecting to find a subject that would satisfy the theme “swarm” when I dropped into the AGNS, but then, this! The physical installation coupled with idea of invasive species swarming the fragile arctic struck a cord with me.

As a painter, I like to think that I am always looking about my world with an appreciative eye. Today’s find has shown me that when I have a particular theme in mind, that theme can be found in the most unexpected places. It’s a really interesting exercise.

20141120-142733-52053341.jpg
The Northern Exposure exhibit is on display until January 5, 2015
Photo 101