The Doors of Mowsley

A stop in South Leicestershire village of Mowsley and Sunday Lunch in the local. 



This 500 year old village has a population of just over 300.  It boasts a terrific pub …. The Staff of Life, where we found a wood fire in the fire place, an older gentleman in a chair by the fire and a handful of fellas leaning on the bar with their pints … and some very fine food. 


And in Mowsley, of course, there are lots of very pretty Doors …




Linked to Norm’s Thursday Doors.

The Doors of Stowe, Vt

Driving north from Boston to Burlington, Vermont, we turned off the Interstate 89 to check out Stowe on a grey, damp, early Spring day. 


It’s March, so shoulder season between skiing and summer. We were treated to a quiet but inviting short walk around the town. 


I loved the effect of the paint wearing off the bricks here. 


Whoa!  Look at the size of the doorway on this church!


I was particularly interested to note that the local elementary school is next door to the town library & arts centre, which in turn, is next to a museum – a school museum. I was touched by message this sends. Teaching an appreciation for history, art and reading. 

Nicely done, Stowe!

Linked to Norm’s Thursday Doors

Doors of Academia UVM

The University of Vermont, founded in 1791, is one of the oldest universities in the United States. I had the pleasure of walking around this campus on a gloriously warm June day.

I learned that John Dewey, of the ” …education is not preparation for life.  Education is life…” fame is counted amount their noted alumni.

Here are just some of the doors:




Linked to Norm’s Thursday Doors

A Door in Burlington


This pretty door belongs to the Follett House (c1840) in Burlington, Vermont. The property was built for a shipping tycoon, Timothy Follett.  


It’s one of many pretty doors in a very pretty town with stunning views.


Standing on the doorstep, looking down College Street, toward the waterfront, Lake Champlain, and the Adirondack Mountains.  

Not a bad place to spend a couple of days!!

Linked to Norm’s Thursday Doors

Doors of Otrobanda

Although it only contains a few blocks, Otrobanda, one of the historically significant quarters of Willemstad, Curacao is packed with a crazy variety of doors.

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From grand entrances…..

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…. to more modest portals.

 

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Some had very interesting architectural features……. (love those posts!)…

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and some funky business doorways.

IMG_5098From tiny abodes…….

IMG_5111to ornate estates.  Here is the Colombian Consulate.

It was so much fun to wander around this district. It was very, very hot and that might explain why it was so quiet.  But with so many interesting buildings, we were pulled along to discover what was around the next corner.

These Caribbean doors are linked to Norm’s Thursday Doors.

Permission to Come Aboard?

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This door leads to the cabins below the deck of the Bluenose II, a replica of the original fishing and racing schooner.  The original schooner Bluenose was purpose built in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia in 1921 in response to a losing an international race off Gloucester, Massachusetts.  And win she did!  The Bluenose held the title for 7 years.  She was also a working boat, fishing cod on the Grand Banks off of Newfoundland until fishing schooners became obsolete. Sadly, in spite of efforts to keep her in Lunenburg, the Bluenose was sold to the West Indies where she worked as a freighter until she struck a reef off Haiti in 1946.

The story continues in 1963, when Olands Brewery commissioned a replica be built by the same Lunenburg shipyard and using the same plans as the Bluenose.  The brewery used Bluenose II to represent their Schooner brand of beer until it was sold to the Province of Nova Scotia for $1.00 (or 10 Canadian dimes) in 1971.  This beautiful vessel then became our “sailing ambassador” and a great source of pride for the people of Nova Scotia and all of Canada.  In fact, her image in on the Canadian ten cent piece (the dime).

After almost 40 years and several refits, the Bluenose II was decommissioned and a “reconstruction” was ordered.  Happily, several weeks ago, the new Bluenose II received the green light to sail and she is ready to work. She was a beautiful sight earlier today, in the morning light, with her crew polishing and preparing to welcome visitors. It feels like a long lost relative has come home….. and after surviving an illness.  We are so happy to have her back.

The name Bluenose comes from a nickname given to the people of Nova Scotia.  We are called Bluenosers.  Is this because of our cold, damp winters? Or, as some say, from the dye rubbing off the fishermen’s mittens as they rubbed their noses in the cold and wet North Atlantic while fishing for cod?

Weekly Photo Challenge: Door.  Also, my entry for Norm’s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors: The Doors Of San Miguel de Allende

In the historic centre of San Miguel de Allende, there are an estimated two thousand doors. Many, many of them are made of hand hewn wood, painted.  They are all so different, and all so beautiful.  Behind those doors are about two thousand courtyards – so intriguing!!  I didn’t take a photo of each of them…. but here are a few:

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This is linked to Thursday Doors Norm 2.0