Schmidtville Doors

I am temporarily hold up in a downtown condo that was built in the early 90’s. To the North, the building fronts onto the city’s busiest shopping street. There are brand new developments under construction immediately to the east and west of me (it’s a little noisy).

But step out the door and turn south, and BOOM! You are in Schmidtville!

This charming wee neighbourhood has recently – very recently, like three months ago recently – been designated a Heritage Conservation District.

Thank goodness for that! This place has the same urban density stats as Paris, proving that we do not need only glass and steel towers to improve urban density. More than that, Schmidtville’s residents provide an excellent example of economic diversity. Plus is really pretty!

Elizabeth Schmidt subdivided Pedley’s Fields after her husband, Capt. Christian Schmidt, died in 1830. The 12 acres of grazing land was purchased by her father, James Pedley, in 1781.

The houses are mainly Georgian in style, but the neighbourhood also has some Victorian architecture.

I’ve been watching this spot. Someone has dug the soil beside this house to expose a deeply buried door. They have only just filled the doorway in with concrete blocks. I wonder where that door went when the house was originally built?

I feel like there is a story there …

Linked to Norm’s Thursday Doors.

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Beacon Hill Doors

Recently, we found ourselves in Boston, on a layover; a few delicious hours to reunite with one of my favourite cities.

Not surprisingly, we gravitated toward Beacon Hill, where the low November sun added to the ambience – even though this shot was taken at 11:00 in the morning.

The pre-Thanksgiving (American) door decorations were bang on point. Natural, understated and elegant.

There were big doors… (love the reflections)9

… small doors …

… and the door of a famous author!

Did I mention it was chilly? As in, and downright cold? These little birdies had the right idea … soaking up the tiniest bit of heat from the sunny door step.

We took our cue from them, and popped into a warm and bustling corner coffee shop.

If you find yourself in this neighbourhood, drop in. The rest of the menu looked just as amazing as the pastries and coffee.

Linked to Norm’s Thursday Doors.

Resilient

Spotted in late August, this little tomato plant is the best example of resilience I have seen in a while. 

I’m assuming the seed of a patio tomato fell from a nearby balcony, lodged itself in a space between the sidewalk and a foundation on a downtown street.  It then would have survived the freeze and thaw cycles of an icy North Atlantic winter.  It would have been tread upon and scraped over. 

Not only did it survive the Halifax winter (and “spring”!) but grew to blossom and even produce fruit on a shaded street that is dominated by massive urban building project. 

If this had been a wee spruce tree, or other native spicies, it would, perhaps have been a charming find.  But a tomato?  Here?  Impressive!  

My hat goes off to you little plant!  I hope the seed of one of those tomatos carries on your impressive will.  

Magic! The Michael Shand Trio

photo

It was an enchanting scene:

I was perched about three rows up, in the Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre, a three-story high space surround by walls of glass overlooking the corner of University and Queen St. in the heart of Toronto.  It was a warm mid-day at the end of September, the trees still green and leafy. At the intersection, the pulse of the city throbbed with vehicles, cyclists, and swarms of pedestrians all moving to the beat of traffic lights.  Inside, I was wedged onto my bench between two obviously seasoned concert goers.  The effect was at once, both intimate and expansive.

The real magic happened when the Micheal Shand Trio began to play. The effect of jazzy musical energy filling that environment and perfectly complimenting the scene outside was magnificent.  The concert lasted a little less than an hour….but I’ve been re-living it ever since. Magic!!