Shelburne Doors

Sometimes you don’t have to travel very far to be blown away by your own history. We took a little drive. About 2 hours south. To the town of Shelburne, Nova Scotia.

Here, we wandered along Historic Dock Street.

Shelburne has an interesting history. During the American Revolution pro-British refugees (Loyalists) gathered in New York. The wealthier classes went to England while others sought refuge here, in Nova Scotia.

In 1783, four hundred such families associated to form the Town of Shelburne (named after the British Prime Minister). Within a year the population of the town mushroomed to 10,000.

The fledging town was not prepared and could not support so large a settlement. Most of the refugees moved on to other parts of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, or on to England. Some returned to the United States.

But of those who stayed, many focused their entrepreneurial spirit into this Nova Scotia town, infusing it with a distinctly New England flavour.

This door takes you into what maybe the last remaining commercial barrel factory in Canada. Traditionally, barrels were used to store and transport fish, food and other items and the staves and hoops were from this factory were exported in huge quantities. Today, are used to store salt bait for the lobster industry.

Across the street is The Coopers Inn. The house was originally built for George Gracie, a blind Loyalist who started the first whaling company in Shelburne.

Next door is a lovely example of a Greek Revival building. I love the storm doors.

The next building was, during the 1780’s, the home and tavern of Patrick McDonough – who was also the customs officer.

On the water side of the street, is a dory shop where the wooden boats are still built to order. It’s part of the Shelburne Historical Society complex.

A glance up Charlotte Lane.

This impressive structure (with a relatively modest door) was the store and warehouse of George A. Cox, an (obviously) prominent merchant. He constructed his own vessels and carried on an extensive world trade.

A former store front on Ann Street.

This former mill is under restoration. That’s good news as it looks like most of the foundation is missing!

The mill is part of the Muir-Cox shipyard which was in almost continuous operation from the 1800’s to 1984. The property launched everything from square riggers and schooners to motorized rum runners, minesweepers and luxury yachts.

The shipyards of Shelburne produced whale boats, life boats, row boats and canoes which were exported to Newfoundland, Bermuda, Ontario, Quebec, the Arctic and the United States. In 1928-29 one boat shop shipped 29 rail cars of boats to Northern Ontario and Quebec in what is believed to be the largest shipment of boats in Canada. Seriously? I had no idea! This waterfront must have been booming.

It was a short visit. But we’ll be back again to visit pretty little Shelburne (pop. 1743) and her intriguing Doors. It seems that she has more stories to tell.

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Vancouver Public Library

Have I mentioned that I have a passion for libraries? I do, you know. I am a card carrying member of my our local branch and seek them out whenever I’m travelling.

I think that the regard in which a community holds its public libraries speaks volumes about the place. ūüėČ

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ine my joy when lo and behold!, I wandered past this beauty….

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ld not resist stepping inside … into this covered courtyard space or "promenade".

Designed to resemble the Roman Colosseum this main branch, on West Georgia Street, opened in 1995. The library itself is a nine-story rectangular structure which houses the usual library business – stacks and services.

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surrounded by a freestanding elliptical, colonnaded wall. Here are reading and study areas which are accessed by bridges spanning skylit light wells. The library's internal glass facade overlook the glass-roofed courtyard.

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space is formed by a second elliptical wall on the east side of the building and provides the entrance and, I suspect, lively and bright protection from Vancouver rainy winters.

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utiful balance of form and function.

Very impressive, Vancouver!! I'd come back to visit any time of year just to further explore this library.

Nautical Doors

The Tall Ships have been and gone.

After much anticipation and massive preparations, 25 Tall Ships visited Halifax for a festive weekend July 30 – Aug 1. There were parties, concerts, picnics, ship tours and fireworks.

Led by Sail Training International, Rendez-Vous 2017 Tall Ships Regatta is a transatlantic race of 7,000 nautical miles taking place over the course of five months in 2017. The race started at the port of Royal Greenwich in Great Britain on April 13.

It finishes in the port of Le Havre, France, which will welcome the grand winner between August 31 and September 3.

The Race route included stops in Portugal, Bermuda, the United States and Canada – coinciding nicely with Canada’s 150th Anniversary as a county.

From Halifax, 13 of the ships made their way to Lunenburg for the weekend of August 10-12. And what’s time we had!!

Alongside Lunenburg’s “shorter” waterfront (no high-rises here!), these tall masts seemed all the more impressive.

The party is over now. And we wish them all Fair Winds!

Linked with Norm’s Thursday Doors

Soft & Strong

The soft, fluffy down of a baby chick.


This little girl has gumption!  

Her mama abandoned her nest just days before the egg was due to hatch. The egg was cold; we didn’t know if was still viable. But we took the chance and cobbled together an incubator out of a styrofoam cooler and a light bulb (Thanks again Internet).  


Right on schedule we heard chirping!  But a day later, nothing more than a wee hole in the egg. She seemed to be struggling, so we peeled back the shell and helped her out.  Back in into the incubator she went, to stay warm and dry off. 


After a day or so, we tried to introduce her to her mama.  Maybe there was still some maternal instinct left?  Nope. The hen pecked the chick till she bled. 

We rescued her again. 

Now she is in a brooder in our laundry room chirping her little head off. My husband says she tweets more than Donald Trump. 

We might call her Twitter. 

WPC –Texture